Sweet & Sour Nutcrackers

This time posting there are two new Blu-ray Nutcrackers under consideration. One will delight and the other will leave a bad taste in your mouth. The dubious and bad one first, a production of the Staatskapelle Berlin featuring its orchestra and corps de ballet conducted by Daniel Barenboim. Credit where it’s due, Barenboim leads a wonderful orchestral performance with outstanding woodwind playing and rich and sonorous strings. But as delightful as things are in the pit, they are quite different on stage. Choreographer Patrice Bart has decided, in trying  to get closer to the original E. T. A. Hoffman story, to make the ballet a psychological coming of age drama married to a power control trip. The character of Herr Drosselmeyer (Oliver Matz) has been given a new prominence and the point that he is in charge like a puppet master is mercilessly

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hammered home, especially in the finale where the characters shuffle off stage looking misplaced extras from Michael Jackson’s Thriller. To add salt to the wounds, the production is somewhat colorless and drab. Still there are a few high moments, including the incredible dancing of Nadja Saidakova and Vladimir Malakhov in the second act “Pas de Deux,” a sequence so stunning in artistry that it almost makes up for the rest. Audio and video quality are just fine. Perhaps you could rent it, just to see that wonderful “Pas de Deux.”

 

In 1954, George Balanchine and  the New York City Opera were chief among the pioneering groups that made The Nutcracker a holiday favorite now danced by every company in the land during December. The film released this year by the C Major label is the 2011 production and it’s a beauty from beginning to end. The party in the first act is festive, the transformation scene, with its  tree that grows from 12 to 40 feet, is magical, as is the rest of

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the production up to the end which finds Marie and her prince transported to the stars in a reindeer pulled sleigh. The dancing is first rate throughout and the orchestra plays admirably well, led by maestra Clotilde Otranto, who chooses fairly brisk tempos throughout. These never seem rushed nor do they seem to pose any problems for the dancers. Overall this is a five star production with state of the arts video and audio reproduction. Not to be missed.